Events

SLAUGHTERHAUS runs a series of studio events throughout the year - including exhibitions, artists’ talks, film nights, open studio weekends and community workshops.

Our classes, exhibition programme and associated programme of talks and film nights in 2019 take the theme of Place as a starting point.

We have invited artists to exhibit this year who are exploring this theme, and will have a series of talks and events as part of this exhibition programme. Some of our courses will also encourage participants to explore this notion of place in their work.

Private View: Friday 20 March 2020, 6.00-8.00pm

Exhibition continues to Thursday 26 March 2020, Monday- Thursday 10.00- 4.00pm and weekend by arrangement.

Sarah’s practice explores ideas of national identity, collective memory, and how land and borders become central sites for tension. She uses landscape as subject matter, fragments of text to suggest ideas of place/time and provoke a sense of foreboding and unease. The works hint at current news, the Brexit process as it unfolds while displaying a rise of nationalism. The land carries memory, personal and collective. She draws connections from deep within the past to pressing issues of today.

“There is an intricate relationship between the theories around memory and how my practice addresses these issues through the processes of making. The form becomes content. The way the materials have been manipulated and created the fragmentary nature of my images, relate to the idea of how memory is fractured. Visuals are developed through different printmaking techniques at different stages. And by ‘landing' on the paper, information is transmitted. Some information is lost; other information is carried through to the final outcome, e.g. an etching line appears on the wood-cut. The loss of information on the surface creates fragmentation, interruptions, and the possibility of ambiguity. Memory is not static. It is organic. It changes, and it can be manipulated. I am not choreographing the direction of the practical. I appreciate the ruins and the absences.”

Private View: Thursday 2 April 2020, 6.00-8.00pm

Exhibition continues to Saturday 25 April 2020

Opening Times: Thursday & Friday 10.00- 4.00pm and all other times by arrangement.

Artists' Talk: Saturday 25 April 2020, 4.00pm.

Closing Party: Saturday 25 April 2020, 2.00- 4.00pm.

The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost’s famous poem, is the title of our second exhibition of the year. The exhibition will showcase the work of James Anderson and includes a number of large, colour-dense abstract prints (an inventive combination of aquatint, carborundum and sugar-lift etchings). Like the poem, the works are a rumination on the nature of choice...the sometimes deliberate, sometimes serendipitous choices that we make...in art as in life; and, perhaps, the ways we justify them read more.

James's prints - fluid, organic forms in strong painterly colours that blend and merge and criss cross - seem effortlessly spontaneous, as though created at the speed of brushwork. And herein lies the tension, the essential drama that energises the work. The impression of the impromptu masks the meticulous, studied craftsmanship; the careful, deliberate planning that is at the heart of printmaking and indeed, all artistic choice. But the road the artist must take is always a kind of collaboration between the dictates of the artist and the serendipity of how the work itself evolves in response to those dictates.

James's prints - fluid, organic forms in strong painterly colours that blend and merge and criss cross - seem effortlessly spontaneous, as though created at the speed of brushwork. And herein lies the tension, the essential drama that energises the work. The impression of the impromptu masks the meticulous, studied craftsmanship; the careful, deliberate planning that is at the heart of printmaking and indeed, all artistic choice. But the road the artist must take is always a kind of collaboration between the dictates of the artist and the serendipity of how the work itself evolves in response to those dictates.

And the stories these works tell are, perhaps, the stories of the road James himself took; the early choices that led him away from architecture to medicine, from life drawing to abstract printmaking. Were they the right ones, the ones less travelled, or simply rationalised as such?

These are strong, confident, powerful works. They provoke strong, powerful reactions. But don’t take our word for it. Come and see.